Plant & Soil Sciences eLibraryPRO
Loading
control panel control panel
 

Lesson Outline

Lesson Media Objects

Greening Up the Greens - Transpiration Application Scenario

Rate Me

A scenario to accompany the online lesson, 'Transpiration - Water Movement Through Plants'.

Greening up the Greens

Patricia Hain
Department of Agronomy and Horticulture at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Roch Gaussoin
Department of Agronomy and Horticulture at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
2005

This scenario accompanies the online lesson, 'Transpiration - Water Movement Through Plants', and is designed to allow you to apply the concepts learned in that lesson to a real-life problem.

Lesson Navigation Tips:
  • To answer questions, select the button next to the correct answer and then select ’check it’ to see if you are correct.

  • To review concepts from the Transpiration - Water Movement Through Plants lesson, click on the link below each question. - Click once on figures to see enlarged versions.

Scenario

You are a student intern for the summer at Fall Oaks Golf Course in eastern Nebraska. After working there for a month you notice that the greens are not in the greatest condition. In the morning the greens are a lush green color, but then during the middle of the day areas turn bluish-green to brown. The greens seem to recover their green color later in the day, but the plant density (thickness of the greens) has been steadily decreasing since you started working there in early June. The other intern, who worked there last summer, comments that it sure didn’t look like this last year!

Greens under heat stress turn bluish-green to brown in color and plant health decreases.
(Roch Gaussoin, 2005)

You decide to impress your boss by taking the initiative to determine how to correct the problem. Before you can make a recommendation, though, you need to gather some information to figure out what the problem is and how it can be remedied.

Your first step is to find out more about the management practices for the greens. You can ask your boss, a Certified Golf Course Superintendent, any of the following questions.

How much is the golf course used?
What are the greens like?
Are the greens fertilized regularly?
How is pest control addressed?
Are the greens receiving enough water?
What was the temperature in June & July of 2004?
What was the temperature in June & July of 2005?
Question : Based on the information you have so far, what do you think is the most likely cause of the problem?

lack of fertilizer
disease
insects
water stress
heat stress
foot-traffic from golfers

Question : What is happening to the environment around the grass plants as the air temperature increases (providing no other conditions change)?

the water holding capacity of the air increases
the relative humidity of the air is less than the same air sample at a lower temperature
the driving force for transpiration increases
all of the above

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Factors Affecting Rates of Transpiration.
Question : How do the grass plants cool themselves?

transpiration
sweat
stomata close
all of the above

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - What and Why.
Question : In addition to cooling the temperature of a plant, transpiration is important to a plant for many reasons. Which of the following is NOT an important result of transpiration?

enables the plant to access nutrients in the soil
carbon dioxide entry
allows toxins to exit through open stomates.
water uptake for biochemical process and turgor

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - What and Why.
Question : When the transpiration rate is extremely high, plants are highly susceptible to __________ .

wind
light
cavitation
excess water uptake

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Major Plant Highlights.
Question : The creeping bentgrass plants on the greens protect themselves from losing too much water by…

opening stomates to increase transpiration
opening stomates to stop transpiration
closing stomates to increase transpiration
closing stomates to stop transpiration

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Major Plant Highlights.
Question : If the grass plants are not transpiring, what will happen to them?

wilt
heat up, causing proteins to break apart and cell death
stop photosynthesizing
stop biochemical processes requiring water
all of the above

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - What and Why.
Question : Why do the greens seem to recover in the evenings and mornings?

less foot traffic allows the plant to rebuild cells
the air temperature decreases and transpiration can resume to cool the plant
the grass plants have more water available in the soil because that’s when the greens are watered
stomates are closed at night allowing the plant to store up water and green up

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Major Plant Highlights.
Question : How could you get the greens to recover during the day?

cool the temperature of the air and plants
heavily irrigate during the day to get more water to the roots
restrict foot-traffic on the greens
all of the above

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Major Plant Highlights.


Describing your findings to your boss, he recommends a management technique called “syringing” be done to the greens in mid-afternoon. He describes “syringing” as a light application of water that is sufficient water to wet the green surface but move minimally down into the soil.

Syringing a green.
(Roch Gaussoin, 2005)
Question : Why would this be effective when the roots are not receiving much moisture?

the relative humidity would increase encouraging the stomates to open and transpiration to resume
the water would cool the temperature of the plant and the air temperature around it
even a little additional moisture for the roots is better than nothing
when it is so hot, plants can take in water through the stomates

To review this concept click on the link Transpiration - Major Plant Highlights.


As a result of your accurate assessment and consultation with your boss, you begin syringing the greens. Over the next few days you see a marked improvement in their appearance.

Healthy greens on a golf course.
(Roch Gaussoin, 2005)

Development of this lesson was supported in part by the Cooperative State
Research, Education, & Extension Service, U.S. Dept of Agriculture under Agreement Number PX2003-06237 administered by Cornell University, Virginia Tech and the American Distance Education Consortium (ADEC) and in part by the New Mexico and Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Stations. Any opinions,findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Comments

Be the first to write a comment...

Control Panel cancel

Create activities for your moodle courses. Moodle Go to moodle
Select and group e-Library Lessons to create your own package... My Communities
Community Blogs Community Media

My Joined Communities

 
My Blogs - a journal of my thoughts... My Blogs
 
My Comments - my thoughts expressed as a feedback... My Comments
 
Classes that I am taking Registered Classes
Class Blogs Class Media
 
Check the scores of assesments that you have taken Taken Assessments
 
clear
Please confirm your selection.